Hot Halloween Idea – Mormon Missionary

Mission Mission Field

Apparently the Mormon missionary look is in this year for Halloween, making Time’s top ten topical costume list. Anyone planning on dressing up? I’m out; too many bad memories.

the short-sleeve, skirt-wrap variation

If we were smart, we’d start selling customized name tags here at MSP to make a profit off the interest in Mormonism.

Interestingly, the articles about this haven’t suggested anyone is going to dress up as sister missionaries. Why isn’t that a hot costume?

the "sister missionary" look

Time’s description of the Mormon missionary costume lists the requirements:

  • short-sleeved white button-up shirt
  • necktie (preferably black, no more than moderately fashionable)
  • name tag
  • Book of Mormon
  • slacks and dress shoes
  • bike helmet and suspenders (optional)
So, they obviously got that wrong on a few points. Suspenders? Seriously? I’ve never seen Mormon missionaries wear suspenders. Black tie? Mormon missionaries have the most awful ties, and they are rarely black. Also, short-sleeved button-up shirt is location specific:
long-sleeve version

But what about a list of requirements to dress up as a sister missionary? Anyone want to contribute a list of required materials? Preferablyformer sister missionaries?

14 thoughts on “Hot Halloween Idea – Mormon Missionary

  1. But what about a list of requirements to dress up as a sister missionary? Anyone want to contribute a list of required materials? Preferably former sister missionaries?

    All you need is a name tag and a six pack. The name tag lets people know what you are, and the six pack insures that they’ll let you in instead of telling you to go to hell.

  2. If we were smart, wed start selling customized name tags here at MSP to make a profit off the interest in Mormonism.

    Do it! Or just sell sets that read Elder or Sister Nielsen.

  3. I had a friend who had a friend whose last name was Rambo, so the guy had all these extra nametags made and gave them to his friends, who loved to go out as Elder Rambo.

  4. We went to a Halloween party last night, and I can confirm that this is a very popular costume this year. There were three sets of Elders (and this is here in So Cal), and only one of the people had any connection to Mormonism.

  5. My Missionary sisters always turn up in dress skirt (pants aren’t allowed). Seems the skirt has to go down below their knees. I suspect their shirt/dress has to have sleeves, too… And dress shoes rather than athletic ones (don’t know how they manage to spend much of the days walking in those without ruining their feet!). They always wear their name tag, of course, and carry this huge combined BoM/Bible with them (one even has a hefty one that also has the other 2 in it, too). Only one earring allowed per ear, apparently (guess that’s a churchwide thing)… One has rather cool psychedelic nail painting on sometimes, tho. Dunno if that’s allowed, but I like it.

  6. @7 — very interesting article! Especially this part:

    LDS Bishop Dennis Toone leader of the Crescent 16th Ward, which hosted the party did not write the flier, but he defended the prohibition against cross-gender costumes, saying “its church policy.”

    Actually, its not.

    The churchs handbook does discourage the wearing of masks, due to “security and safety reasons.” It says nothing else about costumes.

    “The flier,” LDS Church spokesman Scott Trotter said Friday, “does not represent church policy.”

    Toone explained that “we thought it was a church policy,” adding, “Ill defend the church, and anybody who doesnt like it doesnt have to come.”

    OK, so cross-dressing for Halloween isn’t officially against church policy (though some might think it is), but what about for LDS theatrical productions? I’ve read various posts/comments around the Internet suggesting that cross-dressing for a road show or talent night would be against the rules — does anyone have a copy of the CHI to confirm that? (If so, that might explain why people might mistakenly think the rule applies to all costumes.)

  7. I don’t see anything in the 2010 Handbook about cross-dressing. But some tidbits I did come across:

    Masks are allowed in theatrical productions. You’re not allowed to portray Heavenly Father or the Holy Ghost, and if Jesus is portrayed, the actor cannot sing or dance, and must only use quotes from scripture. Nothing is said about Heavenly Mother, so I think someone should write a play about Her.

    Dbutante parties aren’t allowed, nor are activities where kings and queens are selected (such as a homecoming dance). Guide dogs aren’t allowed in temples, which is a terrible policy, if you ask me. “Here, I’ll be your eyes, brother.” “Uh, no. I want my #@!% dog.”

  8. if Jesus is portrayed, the actor cannot sing or dance, and must only use quotes from scripture.

    Wow, what a boring play that would be. Singing and dancing (while interpreting scripture) is the secret to a good portrayal of Jesus. I think you’re right that Heavenly Mother sounds like your best bet if you’d like to include a divine character in your LDS road-show. 🙂

  9. Damn, I think Manny Wyves and Polly Gamus just won our costume contest. And here’s a fun fact: I just checked my family tree and we’re related. 😉 Small world.

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