Proposed Mormon Books!

Read Twilight.

Seriously, do it if you haven’t. Because when it comes to entertainment on the Internet, there’s not much out there that can beat Mormon discussions of Twilight. That’s why I read it (explained in the comments here), and I don’t regret a single page. (And with the movie out, there are plenty of new posts about it.)

It looks like Pixelfish made the same discovery here and is just now trying to figure out Mormons who complain about the fact that the novels “do not go along with LDS beliefs…” — and then tries to guess what a Mormon vampire novel would look like:

Vampires in the geneology library in Salt Lake? Vampires giving the tours at Temple Square? Vampires making rice crispy treats for Homemaking Night? Vampires leading the church choir? Oh, yeah, this is going to be an exciting story!

(Commenter CKD offers: “Vampires eating funeral potatoes…from their own funerals!”)

Of course, we all know there really is a Mormon vampire novel here (which I reviewed here). Arguably better writing than Twilight, but somehow not as famous. Or as funny. (Sorry, Eugene — maybe next time throw in more funeral potatoes! 😉 )

And speaking of funeral potato jokes, this BCC send-up of new Mormon books had me chuckling for days! (Funny how some posts come back to you.) And my fellow atheists wonder why I love Mormon literature so…

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chanson

C. L. Hanson is the friendly American ExMormon atheist mom living in Switzerland! See "letters from a broad" and the novel ExMormon for further adventures!!

5 thoughts on “Proposed Mormon Books!

  1. I recall lots of fretting about when Mormon culture would find its Poe, or whatever. There is this obsession with the idea that “such a learned and enlightened” people MUST eventually produce some great, truly great, literature, culture, etc. But, it seems they’re actually best at producing other kinds of stuff — more prol-ish kinds of things.

    And how could it be otherwise? Embrace your true genius, I say.

    Besides, you can never be inspired to truly great thoughts about human nature and resonating words for human culture if your personal culture is as austere as the Mormon ideal of heaven on earth or otherwise.

    As for Twilight, well, my wife and daughters love it, passionately, and the ward YW’s leadership hates it. That makes me ambivalent.

  2. I think you’re right that Mormon culture is good at producing stuff for the lower brows, so why not embrace it?

    But the problem for Mormons is more than just “such a learned and enlightened people MUST eventually produce some great, truly great, literature, culture, etc.” Great art and literature can provide insight about the human condition, so if Mormonism really is the ultimate, truest key to the human soul, then logically the best art should come from Mormons. It may be a trial to some people’s faith to see that that hasn’t happened. It can’t help but hint at your (heretical) suggestion that it’s Mormonism’s limited worldview itself that’s the problem…

    As for Twilight, well, my wife and daughters love it, passionately, and the ward YW’s leadership hates it.

    Right, that’s what’s so fascinating about Twilight — it arouses such strong reactions.

  3. Cheers to you, Chanson. :)

    t may be a trial to some people’s faith to see that that hasn’t happened.

    I think that’s the ultimate blanket belief for wrapping and suffocating disappointment. And this is probably also a significant hurdle. God just wants his people to be child-like in their innocence. Innocent in heart and mind. Without guile. In short, he wants them to be subservient … sub-human. Of course, “He” is no god at all, rather the extrusion of thousands of minds crying out for fear and worship of themselves.

    And, back to the topic, their books are a view into their minds. Blessed books. The only true revelation. :)

  4. Chanson, on the subject of Twilight, check out the late 90s TV series Roswell.

    We’re watching it via NetFlix right now … watching the pilot tonight … and have been noticing that the plot and many individual plot devices appear to be, uh, uncannily similar. Guess which one came first?

    My guess is that Stephanie Meyer was a Roswell fan before her books “unfolded like a movie in [her] head”.

    I’m a little creeped-out by this. See this blog post and comments where ‘the rip-off’ has also been called-out. Though right now there doesn’t appear to be too much written about it around the web … yet.

    Anyway, check it out. Turns out that Twilight may be to Roswell what the BoM is to the Bible.

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